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External Commercial Borrowings

The foreign currency borrowings raised by the Indian corporate from confirmed banking sources outside India are called "External Commercial Borrowings" (ECBs). These Foreign Currency borrowings can be raised within ECB Policy guidelines of Govt. of India/ Reserve Bank of India applicable from time to time.

ECBs at Project Funding India.Com
Project Funding India is very active and is a leading player in   arranging various forms of foreign currency facilities through ECB route for the Indian Corporate &  focuses on all type of foreign currency credit requirements of Indian corporate in arranging the Foreign Currency Loans.
Project Funding India Is  India's Largest Consultancy Firm  ,having a strong global presence with  multiple branches / offices in countries  few decades of experience in arranging foreign currency loans. This long experience and wide presence across the globe .
ECB through Syndicated Loans- Stages in brief:
Guidelines on ECBs
External Commercial Borrowings (ECBs) are defined to include commercial bank loans, buyers' credit, suppliers' credit, securitized instruments such as Floating Rate Notes and Fixed Rate Bonds etc., credit from official export credit agencies and commercial borrowings from the private sector window of Multilateral Financial Institutions such as International Finance Corporation (Washington), ADB, AFIC, CDC, etc.  ECBs are being permitted by the Government as a source of finance for Indian Corporate for expansion of existing capacity as well as for fresh investment. The policy seeks to keep an annual cap or ceiling on access to ECB, consistent with prudent debt management.  The policy also seeks to give greater priority for projects in the infrastructure and core sectors such as Power, oil Exploration, Telecom, Railways, Roads & Bridges, Ports, Industrial Parks and Urban Infrastructure etc. and the export sector.  Applicants will be free to raise ECB from any internationally recognized source such as banks, export credit agencies, suppliers of equipment, foreign collaborators, foreign equity-holders, international capital markets etc. offers from unrecognized sources will not be entertained
Borrowers may enter into loan agreement complying with the ECB guidelines with recognised lender for raising ECB under Automatic Route without the prior approval of the Reserve Bank. The borrower must obtain a Loan Registration Number (LRN) from the Reserve Bank of India before drawing down the ECB. The procedure for obtaining LRN
1. ECB refer to commercial loans [in the form of bank loans, buyers' credit, suppliers' credit, securitised instruments (e.g. floating rate notes and fixed rate bonds)] availed from non-resident lenders with minimum average maturity of 3 years. ECB can be accessed under two routes, viz.,
(i) Automatic Route 
(ii) Approval Route 
I.(A) AUTOMATIC ROUTE
The following types of proposals for ECBs are covered under the Automatic Route.
Eligible borrowers:-
Corporate, including those in the hotel, hospital, software sectors (registered under the Companies Act, 1956) and Infrastructure Finance Companies (IFCs) except financial intermediaries, such as banks, financial institutions (FIs), Housing Finance Companies (HFCs) and Non-Banking Financial Companies (NBFCs) are eligible to raise ECB. Individuals, Trusts and Non-Profit making organizations are not eligible to raise ECB.Units in Special Economic Zones (SEZ) are allowed to raise ECB for their own requirement.
Non-Government Organizations (NGOs) engaged in micro finance activities are eligible to avail of ECB. Such NGOs (i) should have a satisfactory borrowing relationship for at least 3 years with a scheduled commercial bank authorized to deal in foreign exchange in India and (ii) would require a certificate of due diligence on `fit and proper' status of the Board/ Committee of management of the borrowing entity from the designated AD bank.
Recognised Lenders: - Borrowers can raise ECB from internationally recognized sources such as
international banks ,international capital markets, multilateral financial institutions (such as IFC, ADB, CDC, etc.) / regional financial institutions and Government owned development financial institutions,

Amount and Maturity:-

The maximum amount of ECB which can be raised by a corporate other than those in the hotel, hospital and software sectors is USD 750 million or its equivalent during a financial year.

Corporates in the services sector viz. hotels, hospitals and software sector are allowed to avail of ECB up to USD 200 million or its equivalent in a financial year for meeting foreign currency and/ or Rupee capital expenditure for permissible end-uses. The proceeds of the ECBs should not be used for acquisition of land .
ECB up to USD 20 million or its equivalent in a financial year with minimum average maturity of three years.

ECB above USD 20 million or equivalent and up to USD 750 million or its equivalent with a minimum average maturity of five years.
NGOs engaged in micro finance activities can raise ECB up to USD 5 million or its equivalent during a financial year. Designated AD bank has to ensure that at the time of drawdown the forex exposure of the borrower is fully hedged.
End-use:-

ECB can be raised for investment [such as import of capital goods (as classified by DGFT in the Foreign Trade Policy), new projects, modernization/expansion of existing production units] in real sector - industrial sector including small and medium enterprises (SME), infrastructure sector and specified service sectors namely hotel, hospital, software in India.

Overseas direct investment in Joint Ventures (JV)/ Wholly Owned Subsidiaries (WOS) subject to the existing guidelines on Indian Direct Investment in JV/ WOS abroad.

Utilization of ECB proceeds is permitted for first stage acquisition of shares in the disinvestment process and also in the mandatory second stage offer to the public under the Government's disinvestment programme of PSU shares.

For lending to self-help groups or for micro-credit or for bonafide micro finance activity including capacity building by NGOs engaged in micro finance activities.

Payment for Spectrum Allocation.

Infrastructure Finance Companies (IFCs) i.e. Non Banking Financial Companies (NBFCs) categorized as IFCs by the Reserve Bank, are permitted to avail of ECBs, including the outstanding ECBs, up to 50 per cent of their owned funds, for on-lending to the infrastructure sector as defined under the ECB policy, subject to their complying with the following conditions: i) compliance with the norms prescribed in the DNBS Circular DNBS.PD.CCNo.168 / 03.02.089 / 2009-10 dated February 12, 2010 ii) hedging of the currency risk in full. Designated Authorised Dealer should ensure compliance with the extant norms while certifying the ECB application.


End-uses not permitted :

For on-lending or investment in capital market or acquiring a company (or a part thereof) in India by a corporate [investment in Special Purpose Vehicles (SPVs), Money Market Mutual Funds (MMMFs), etc., are also considered as investment in capital markets).for real estate sector for working capital, general corporate purpose and repayment of existing Rupee loans.


Guarantees:
Issuance of guarantee, standby letter of credit, letter of undertaking or letter of comfort by banks, Financial Institutions and Non-Banking Financial Companies (NBFCs) from India relating to ECB is not permitted.


Security:

The choice of security to be provided to the lender/supplier is left to the borrower. However, creation of charge over immoveable assets and financial securities, such as shares, in favour of the overseas lender is subject to Regulation 8 of Notification No. FEMA 21/RB-2000 dated May 3, 2000 and Regulation 3 of Notification No. FEMA 20/RB-2000 dated May 3, 2000, respectively, as amended from time to time. AD Category - I banks have been delegated powers to convey 'no objection' under the Foreign Exchange Management Act (FEMA), 1999 for creation of charge on immovable assets, financial securities and issue of corporate or personal guarantees in favour of overseas lender / security trustee, to secure the ECB to be raised by the borrower.

2 APPROVAL ROUTE
Eligible borrowers:
The following types of proposals for ECB are covered under the Approval Route:
On lending by the EXIM Bank for specific purposes will be considered on a case by case basis.
Banks and financial institutions which had participated in the textile or steel sector restructuring package as approved by the Government are also permitted to the extent of their investment in the package and assessment by the Reserve Bank based on prudential norms. Any ECB availed for this purpose so far will be deducted from their entitlement.
ECB with minimum average maturity of 5 years by Non-Banking Financial Companies (NBFCs) from multilateral financial institutions, reputable regional financial institutions, official export credit agencies and international banks to finance import of infrastructure equipment for leasing to infrastructure projects.
Infrastructure Finance Companies (IFCs) i.e. Non-Banking Financial Companies (NBFCs), categorized as IFCs, by the Reserve Bank, are permitted to avail of ECBs, including the outstanding ECBs, beyond 50 per cent of their owned funds, for on-lending to the infrastructure sector as defined under the ECB policy, subject to their complying with the following conditions compliance with the norms prescribed in the DNBS Circular DNBS.PD.CCNo.168 / 03.02.089 /2009-10 dated February 12, 2010 ii) hedging of the currency risk in full. Designated Authorised Dealer should ensure compliance with the extant norms while certifying the ECB application.
Foreign Currency Convertible Bonds (FCCBs) by Housing Finance Companies satisfying the following minimum criteria: (i) the minimum net worth of the financial intermediary during the previous three years shall not be less than Rs. 500 crore, (ii) a listing on the BSE or NSE, (iii) minimum size of FCCB is USD 100 million and (iv) the applicant should submit the purpose / plan of utilization of funds.
Special Purpose Vehicles, or any other entity notified by the Reserve Bank, set up to finance infrastructure companies / projects exclusively, will be treated as Financial Institutions and ECB by such entities will be considered under the Approval Route. 
Multi-State Co-operative Societies engaged in manufacturing activity and satisfying the following criteria i) the Co-operative Society is financially solvent and ii) the Co-operative Society submits its up-to-date audited balance sheet.
SEZ developers can avail of ECBs for providing infrastructure facilities within SEZ, as defined in the extant ECB policy like (i) power, (ii) telecommunication, (iii) railways, (iv) roads including bridges, (v) sea port and airport, (vi) industrial parks, (vii) urban infrastructure (water supply, sanitation and sewage projects), (viii) mining, exploration and refining and (ix) cold storage or cold room facility, including for farm level pre-cooling, for preservation or storage of agricultural and allied produce, marine products and meat.
Corporates in the services sector viz. hotels, hospitals and software sector can avail of ECB beyond USD 100 million per financial year.
Corporates which have violated the extant ECB policy and are under investigation by the Reserve Bank and / or Directorate of Enforcement are allowed to avail of ECB only under the approval route.
Cases falling outside the purview of the automatic route limits and maturity period indicated at paragraph A (iii).
Recognised Lenders:
Borrowers can raise ECB from internationally recognised sources such as (i) international banks, (ii) international capital markets, (iii) multilateral financial institutions (such as IFC, ADB, CDC, etc.)/ regional financial institutions and Government owned development financial institutions, (iv) export credit agencies, (v) suppliers' of equipment, (vi) foreign collaborators and (vii) foreign equity holders (other than erstwhile OCBs).From 'foreign equity holder' where the minimum paid-up equity held directly by the foreign equity lender is 25 per cent but ECBs: equity ratio exceeds 4:1 (i.e. the proposed ECB exceeds four times the direct foreign equity holding).


Amount and Maturity :

Corporates in the services sector viz. hotels, hospitals and software sector are allowed to avail of ECB beyond USD 100 million or its equivalent in a financial year for meeting foreign currency and/ or Rupee capital expenditure for permissible end-uses. The proceeds of the ECBs should not be used for acquisition of land.

Corporates can avail of ECB of an additional amount of USD 250 million with average maturity of more than 10 years under the approval route, over and above the existing limit of USD 500 million under the automatic route, during a financial year. Other ECB criteria, such as end-use, recognized lender, etc., need to be complied with. Prepayment and call/put options, however, would not be permissible for such ECB up to a period of 10 years.